Category Archives: Handicappers

Handicappers

How to Organise A Charity Golf Day

The way the yellow ball competition works is that each team starts with a yellow ball and each player in turn has to use this ball. the prize is anything we need to get rid of and has included a beer cooler, a battery drill and a case of beer.

We have also held auctions after the golf and we have put up lots such as holidays,tickets to sports events, restaurant vouchers, football club shirts and anything else that you can cajole people and businesses into giving. We have in our latest event charged £10 for an envelope which includes draw tickets and an entry into the putting competition ,Nearest the Pin and Longest Drive. We have been lucky that we have been able to enlist the services of a local farmer who has conducted many auctions and is also an entertainer in his own right. For the team score we count the best 2 scores for the first 6 holes,the best 3 scores on holes 7 to 12 and all scores on the last 6 holes. this makes it slightly easier for the person collating the scores. Make sure any one who is going to run the auction is “pushy” so you get as much from the auction as possible.

A general point is to make sure that you have enough people helping your golf dayand they all need to know what you want them to do. This needs to include what food and refreshments they can offer, free use of buggies to place advertising banners on the course, Nearest the Pin and Longest Drive markers and anything else you can think of. But don’t turn down single players as you can usually make up more teams from these single players.

Find sponsors for each hole. Anyone who has reasonable Excel skills can easily develop a programme to add up these scores, if not we are happy to sell you a copy of ours at nominal cost. we have an arrangement with a manufacturer so we make a small profit on this.

Organise a draw to be drawn on the day. If you stress that it is for charity they are normally happy to help financially.

Start getting teams to enter we try to get teams of 4 which means that it is easier to organise when they are playing. We have also approached with great success,  local organisations providing such things as Shepherds Hut holidays, Gliding, Zorbing, Shooting and alpaca walking.

Who we are…….

How we have done it …….

First select your chosen cause and set a realistic target

Seek a local business as a major sponsor. You will need to buy trophies as you see fit for overall winner, Nearest Pin, longest Drive, Champion Putter etc.

We play full handicap scoring for both team competition and individual. We had about a 95% take up.

Get prizes. If the ball gets lost the team does not qualify. We get them to pay a set amount for the hole ( charge more for 1 and 18 as most sponsors seem to like these holes). We have enlisted the help of a lovely lady who registers all the players, enters scores and sells the £10 envelopes, she is  probably the reason we get such a good uptake in selling these!

HAVE FUN AND A SUCCESSFUL DAY

Finally remember what you are doing this for-

DORSET-Home of The Redpost Golf Society

To raise as much money for your Chosen Charity by any means you canthink of!

The Redpost Golf Society  based in Dorset in the UK have now run 4 Charity events and raised in excess of £12000 and would like to pass on to anyone who has an interest in golf and is looking to run a Charity golf day how we have done it and hope it proves helpful.Organising a golf day is great fun and rewarding but it is hard work and you need to constantly badger people to help you out.

www.redpost-golf-society.co.uk. We were lucky enough to find the Hearn Group of Companies in Dorchester and they have made a regular contribution to all of our events

Book a golf course well in advance of the event and settle the amount they want to charge and agree what is to be provided. you can contact us on www.redpost-golf-society.co.uk We also run a yellow ball competition and a nearest the mystery prize on the 18th fairway. We ask if they are to provide their own advertising banner to place around the hole or if they would like us to provide one. A good source of prizes are from local golf clubs who are usually willing to donate green fee tickets especially if you have played on their course. A dustbin is placed on the 18th fairway at an average driving length so the big hitters have to throttle down if they want to win and the highest handicappers still have a chance of winning. Anyone without the tickets cannot enter the competitions. All the scores with this ball are added up at the end of the round and we give a prize usually a green fee voucher to the winning team

How To Choose The Right Shaft Flex For Your Golf Clubs

What about Extra Stiff? I can count the number of people on one hand that actually need or use an Extra Stiff shaft. Further, if you have a swing that gets jerky at the top, especially starting the downswing, you’ll probably need a stiffer shaft. It makes the science of hitting the ball so much easier, which translates to more enjoyment on the course.

Jack Moorehouse is the author of the best-selling book “How To Break 80…And Shoot Like The Pros!” http://www.howtobreak80.com. Or, if you have clubs with a shaft flex that is not very stiff, the clubhead will be tend to be closed at impact, resulting in a hook.

5. He is NOT a golf pro, rather a working man that helped thousands of golfers lower their handicaps without quitting their day jobs.

o If you know (or have been told) you have a very smooth swing, you might benefit from a softer flex even if you swing very fast. Ladies

Here’s what I do:

2. Not good.

About The Author

How To Choose The Right Shaft Flex For Your Golf Clubs

 by: Jack Moorehouse

A good pro will take a lot of measurements, watch your swing, measure your swing speed, watch your ball flight and be able to tell you with certainty which flex is right for you. Senior

Choose Your Flex Type

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Keep in mind one very important thing about the shaft of your club and its flex. This means you need a shaft that will properly match your swing type and speed so that it can deliver the clubface back to a square position at impact.

3.

4. If this describes you (and you know who you are), you should consider a softer flex to help you slow your swing down. To be more specific, your flex will impact how straight you hit the ball, how high or low it goes and how long or short it travels.

For example, if the flex of your clubs is too stiff, the clubface will tend to be open, sending the ball in a slicing direction. Just go ahead and “waggle” your club a little and see how much the shaft bends and you will get an idea of what “flex” is. If you can carry you driver 250 yards or more, go with Stiff; 230-250 yards, Regular; 200-230 yards, Senior; less than 200 yards, Ladies.

If you are not comfortable determining which flex you should choose on your own, go see your local pro at the course you play at or your driving range. Not 100% accurate but the best club to use for this purpose. Stiff

This article was posted on February 15, 2006

o Your driver will be your best gauge on which flex you need. Most high-handicappers (especially men) tend to over-swing.

If you find a flex that feels good and produces a good ball flight, there’s a good chance that’s the right flex for you. Only guys like John Daily and Long Drive Champions need that type.

All low handicappers and golfers who are serious about shooting the lowest scores possible consider flex in their clubs. Slowing down the swing will certainly produce more accurate shots and better distance control.

The Best (and most accurate way) to Choose Flex Type

1.

Why is the flex in your shaft important? Well, when you have a flex that doesn’t match the needs of your swing, the result is the clubface being misaligned at impact, causing your shots to go off-target. As the shaft flexes throughout the swing, the position of the clubhead will change. Extra Stiff

Now, when I say “flex”, I am referring to the ability of a golf shaft to bend as forces are applied to it during the golf swing. This will take a lot of the guesswork out of the equation.

I always am experimenting with different shafts and flex types because I know that if my swing is on plane and accurate, my shaft flex type can be adversely affecting my results.

And lastly, here’s the best advice I can give on choosing flex. Regular

There are five basic categories or types of shaft flex: .

o If shots with your driver tend to go left, you might benefit from a stiffer flex; if your drives go right, you might benefit from a softer flex.

What you want to do is to experiment by hitting lots of different clubs and watching the effects on your shots of changing shaft flex

The Best Horse Racing Books

A great book to dip into when a losing streak has you looking for new ideas.

Kinky Handicapping by Mark Cramer

Cramer is one of the most entertaining and thought-provoking handicapping writers there is, and Kinky Handicapping is his magnum opus. I can’t imagine a horse racing fan who won’t enjoy paging through this book.

The Race for the Triple Crown by Joe Drape

New York Times writer Joe Drape gives an excellent history of a year on the Derby Trail among the high class stables of New York, a world far removed from the scrape-along lifestyle at most race tracks.

Modern Pace Handicapping By Tom Brohammer

If you only read one book about pace handicapping, this should be the one. The focus here is on non-fiction books, although there’s no shortage of fictional horse racing books. Beyer on Speed gives a solid overview of how speed figures are made as well as how they might be employed for betting success. Ragozin doesn’t give away the store here, but there’s still plenty of good information as well as an enjoyable read for horse racing fans.

General Interest Horse Racing Books

Secretariat: The Making of a Champion by William Nack

Nack is a long time Sports Illustrated writer who had unprecedented access to the great Secretariat and his connections during “Big Red’s” amazing career. I’ve spent countless happy hours with this book revisiting some old friends as well as learning about the greats before my time. Here are my choices for the best horse racing books.

Handicapping Books

The Best of Thoroughbred Handicapping by James Quirin

Quinn was the most prolific of handicapping writers in the 80′s and 90′s. Crist, an executive and columnist with the Daily Racing Form, has ably filled that hole with this book, which offers some solid strategies for tackling both single and multi-race exotics. A must for every horseplayer’s bookshelf.

Laughing in the Hills by Bill Barich

Barich is a terrific writer, and here he gives a wonderful account of bumming around the Northern California racing circuit in the late 1970s, marking time and getting to know the colorful denizens of the Golden Gate Fields backside.

Stud: Adventures in Breeding by Kevin Conley

A behind-the-scenes look at the world of high-class breeding, where millions of dollars are at stake, and wealthy breeders roll the dice as they “breed the best to the best and hope for the best.” Conley gives as a look into the breeding life of the great sire Storm Cat, as well as the Godolphin breeding operation, where Dubai’s Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum spends tens of millions trying for that elusive Derby winner

The Odds Must Be Crazy by Len Ragozin

Ragozin is the creator of the famous “Sheets” performance figures (which some consider a bargain at $25 a pop), and this autobiography cum handicapping tome gives a broad overview of how the numbers are created as well as how their users employ pattern matching to find live horses that may offer solid value in the mutual pools. Not a great place to start for the novice, but well worth reading for more experienced players.

The Winning Horseplayer by Andrew Beyer

Written in 1983 it’s still an excellent introduction to trip handicapping and how to relate trips to speed figures. In this book, recently republished by DRF Press, he brings together a comprehensive overview of most aspects of modern handicapping theory. I’ve divided this article into two sections, one focusing on handicapping books, and the other on more general interest books. MPH contains a complete overview of the classic Sartin Methodology by its best-known (and perhaps most successful) practitioner. Nack gives us a ring side seat for all the twists and turns leading up to his incredible Triple Crown Campaign. Davidowitz gives a solid treatment of virtually all aspects of handicapping from speed and pace handicapping to workouts, conditioning, trainers, pedigree, and betting strategy. Crist is a pick six specialist, and his treatment of how to use multiple tickets to tackle that difficult bet is well worth the price of the book.

Commonsense Betting by Dick Mitchell

Winning at the track takes more than good handicapping. Cramer virtually invented the idea of unconventional handicapping as a way of uncovering hidden value, and here he offers ways to use pedigree handicapping, company lines, and other contrarian methods to beat the speed handicappers at their own game.

. A meticulously researched account of Seabiscuit’s rags to riches story, as well as that of his owner, trainer, and jockey.

What are the best horse racing books?  Horse Racing has an excellent body of literature that surpasses most sports in its quality and variety. The book is more notable for its exiting narrative than its handicapping secrets, but speed figures and track bias played a large part in his success.

Figure Handicapping By James Quinn

As the title suggests, speed and pace figures are the focus here. There’s something about the beauty of the thoroughbred and the color of the backstretch that brings out the lyrical side of many writers. Sadly, several of the books mentioned here are out of print, but they can often be found on ebay or at abebooks. Meadow is a serious player and the information here is rock solid.

Exotic Betting by Steven Crist

Most of the best handicapping books were written before exotic betting came to dominate the mutual pools, and this has left a big hole in the literature for horseplayers seeking the big score. I particularly enjoyed Ragozin’s war stories about his experiences as a horse owner and bettor (he and his partner Len Friedman have poured millions into the parimutuel pools over the years). He also provides a figure method for the turf based on late speed as a deciding factor.

Handicapping Magic by Michael Pizzolla

There haven’t been a lot of additions to the body of handicapping knowledge since the glory days of the 70′s and 80′s, but former Sartin disciple Pizzolla at least contributes something new with his Balanced Speed Ratings and Fulcrum Pace. The information is certainly a bit dated, but there’s still lots of good food for thought considering the book was published 25 years ago.

Horse of a Different Color by Jim Squires

A great account of what it’s like to be a small time breeder by Jim Squires, the former Chicago Tribune editor turned thoroughbred breeder who hit the big time when he bred the Kentucky Derby winner Monarchos.

Seabiscuit: An American Legend by Laura Hillenbrand

A book that hardly needs an introduction, given the sensation it made when published. Beyer always interleavens his handicapping books with lots of good stories that bring out the magic of the track from the bettor’s point of view.

Betting Thoroughbreds by Steve Davidowitz

For my money this is the best general handicapping book ever written, and a great place to start for novices looking to expand their knowledge as well as more seasoned players looking to move up. My favorite part of the book details Beyer’s expedition into the virgin territory of Australian racing, where he attempted to use his figures to conquer the fat betting pools down under.

Money Secrets at the Racetrack by Barry Meadow

Many consider this the best book ever written on money management and the mathematical aspect of value betting and exotic betting. Quinn gives an introduction into how figures are made, as well as their application as part of the general handicapping process. In addition to an excellent chapter on money management, Mitchell teaches you how to calculate the cost of any exotic wager, make an odds line, as well as how to know when a bet is offering value on the tote board.

Champions by Daily Racing Form Staff

An awesome collection of lifetime past performance for every eclipse award winner since the 1890′s. If you’ve ever wanted to know about feet-per-second calculations, early, late and sustained pace, decision models, track profiles and all the other tools of high-tech pace handicapping, this is the place to start.

Thoroughbred Handicapping State of the Art by William Quirin

Quirin was among the first to do a major computer study of American horse racing. It also requires solid money management, and that’s where Commonsense Betting comes in. This book covers speed and pace figures, Quirin Speed Points, pedigree handicapping on the grass, even trip handicapping.

My $50,000 Year at the Races by Andrew Beyer

Andy Beyer always delivers a good read, and this account of his home run year of 1977 when he beat the races for 50 large while splitting his time between Gulfstream Park and the Maryland tracks is one of my favorite racing books ever. A great portrait of the greatest horse of all time.

Speed Handicapping by Andrew Beyer

By the time this was written in 1993, speed figures had lost most of their value in the parimutuel pools, but Beyer is nothing if not a die hard figure player